After chatting with Graham Pullin, who is a great lecturer and mentor, I decided that the best way to express where I am to others is to write a personal manifesto.

“A personal manifesto is a declaration of your core values and beliefs, what you stand for, and how you intend to live your life. It functions both as a statement of principles and as a call to action. A personal manifesto can serve as all of the following:” – Marelisa Fabrega.

Being an interdisciplinary creative, I felt that my manifesto should definitely have some aesthetics and potentially can show some of my skills in itself. For that I looked into my previous internship letters from last year.

Letters for design agencies

Letters for design agencies from 2015

I’ve rewritten the manifesto (using a great app called Folding Text), making it shorter (and than had a great free-of-charge editor’s advice from the native speaking Leanne on it) and easier to read. Since I used vectors last time, it was the perfect opportunity for utilising Vivus.js discovered previously. It’s a vector drawing script which makes the “Hello” in the beginning of my manifesto draw itself out nicely.

SVG Animated by Vivus.js

SVG Animated by Vivus.js

For the text, Salad Mono typeface previously recommended to me by my classmate Rich has been a great match. “Salad days is a Shakespearean term to refer to youthful inexperience and enthusiasm – perfect for a first font” – says Ben. I like monospaced typefaces, partially inspired by what we are doing in Social Digital these days.

Salad Mono - Monospaced typeface by Ben Marsh

Salad Mono – Monospaced typeface by Ben Marsh

For the text which types itself onto page, TypeIt.js was used. A great script with nice options which types text into a webpage. I especially appreciate that it’s designed to make you feel the text is being typed in by a human 🙂

Text on the manifesto website typed by typeit.js

Text on the manifesto website typed by typeit.js